Category Archives: Succeeding

Being a Writer :)

Logo Leicester Writes

 

Well, it looks set to be a busy second half of the year, with short stories to appear in no less than four new collections!

It starts this weekend when Mum and I will be travelling to Leicester to be part of The Leicester Writes Literary Festival! The winners’ anthology from their competition will be launched tomorrow and if anyone fancies it you can still get tickets! Here’s the link:

Winners’ Anthology Launch

I will be reading from my story We Went There. This is a new one of mine about a woman taking her dad, who suffers from dementia, to a home when she uncovers a secret… is he who she thought he was? Is she? And now she knows what will she do?

As I have so often said, writing does not have to be a lonely experience. But of course, a huge part of it is sitting alone in front of your keyboard tap-tap-tapping away! Successes are something to be celebrated since we all know how hard it is to have them, and so when you get the chance to celebrate them alongside other writers then you must!

I will be in good company with the other writers including winner C G Menon and second place¬†Siobhan Logan, me as a humble third place ūüôā Also joined by highly commended Lynne E Blackwood and worthy runners-up: Karl Quiqley, Jack Wedgebury, Katherine Hetzel, Asha Krishna, Matthew Rhodes, Bev Haddon ūüôā

Read what the judges had to say about the stories here: LINK

Judges were: writers Rebecca Burns, Divya Ghelani, Nina Stibbe, and Grace Haddon as well as bookseller, Debbie James.

It is a real honour to be part of this line-up and to have my story published by Dahlia Publishing, and edited by fellow writer and friend: Richard Sheehan. Can’t wait to meet everyone and celebrate our success! The book looks great; I have seen the proof and will read as many of the stories as I can before the event tomorrow!

We set off in the morning (so no Blog tomorrow) and then celebrate tomorrow night at the event, home Saturday afternoon. Can’t wait!

 

Leicster Writes

Do come along if you can… I will blog about it next week!

Have a great weekend everyone!

WHOO!

 

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Self Editing: Eveything you need to know

I had planned a post at some point similar to this, but when I read the talented Sharon Zink’s page I decided to share it.

Sharon is an amazing writer and I have had her on my blog. She also does the same job as me in that she offers manuscript appraisals; the same level of detail.

So I decided to share this link because it really is a masterclass in writing and everything on here is exactly the kind of thing I say to clients all the time when I assess their manuscripts…

Take heed fellow scribes!

I am now about to write the homecoming chapter on Pelicans… this is exciting, it’s the final chapter when we reveal the last of the missing pieces… and it’s raining so I am loving the sounds of rain on the roof as I write! The morning goes pitter patter… ‚̧

Have a wonderful day everyone!

http://sharonzink.com/writing-tips/all-first-drafts-are-sht-so-heres-a-masterclass-on-self-editing/

 

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In The Zone… again

Last night I was interested to see in BBC4’s The Brain that many of our day to day activities are not under our conscious control. As we learn and develop new skills, continuous daily action hardwires the brain and brings about physical changes. So patterns that seem to require a lot¬†of skill initially and fire up a lot of neurones, become fixed established brain patterns. This is why things like learning to drive can be challenging but once established and fixed in the brain, you can do it without thinking about it.

It’s how we move so apparently effortlessly, it’s how we do just about anything that we do a lot!

They talked about being ‘in the zone’ where time loses meaning and we just do things, seemingly on autopilot. I love this idea of how our brains get physically changed by things we do all the time. Mum thinks when I work I read fast, when I don’t think I do, but I am guessing since it’s my job I read faster than her and I also spot things I would never have spotted once by training myself to look for errors and incorrect spacing etc.

As I sit here now typing I barely look down at the keys and yet I was never taught touch typing but when it’s something you do every day and have for so long it’s amazing how competent we become.

I think losing myself in the creative flow is the thing I love the most about my writing life. I have struggled a little to capture the beating heart of the new novel but now I know what it is telling me it wants to be I am excited. It’s a process and one that once immersed in becomes a real joy. I wonder which part of my brain has been changed to accommodate the new story and its new characters. I wonder if fictitious characters create neural pathways of their own and implant memories that while not real in the usual sense, are real never the less. Are these pathways any different, I wonder, to real memories?

 

I will leave you with that thought as we draw closer to the weekend. I am adding model to my CV this weekend as I have been asked to take part in a charity fashion show, for my sins! I did think when they asked me to help that I would be needed to proof fliers or the like, but no they meant model the clothes! Now I have never seen myself as a model I have to say and I did say no repeatedly until I had no choice! It’s all in a good cause and I do not intend to strut my stuff on the catwalk (and yes there is one apparently!) too seriously! Me? Come on.

See you next week folks and thanks for reading!

brain

 

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The Day the World Stopped #JFK51

Tomorrow marks the 51st anniversary of that fateful day in Dallas when John F Kennedy was assassinated. Today, the Friday, is the actual day of the week, 12.30pm.

 

kennedy for president buttonjpg

From website: LINK

With the Zapruder tapes, it remains one of, if not THE, most watched and most studied murders captured on film. The very public nature of it and the conjecture that came from it, puts it up there as one of the most iconic moments in history and it sits in the top ten list of conspiracy theories; being labelled THE quintessential conspiracy theory.

Why it captured my imagination the way it did and hence became integral to my novel, I don’t know. It hit me one day what other news stories are overshadowed when something as big as this impacts on our lives. That concept inspired our¬†On This Day short story collection at Bridge House and some later works of mine. And of course is the premise of While No One Was Watching; Eleanor Boone goes missing from the grassy knoll at that exact moment.

I know I have talked about it here before, about the role of fact in fiction, but it continues to fascinate me and I am itching to recapture that sense of time and place, as I did for Lydia and the American civil rights movement when I revisit Colourblind. This was one of my training novels and one I really want to dive back into. I know it has something.

It’s a year on since we marked the 50th anniversary with my big launch event on Canvey, a day I remember so well and so fondly, having already celebrated its release and started to get some great reaction to it with my lovely friends in North Wales as well. And it marked the start of Lydia coming into her own when I started to give readings in her voice.

And a year on, some 60 reviews later (virtually all 5 star or 4 star) and reasonable  sales (not anywhere near the figures reached with the big presses but respectable never the less) I am still plugging away. And I still hold the dream alive that one day While No One Was Watching makes it onto the BIG screen. Keep dreaming they say and I always will. Come on!

I will mark tomorrow in WHSmith in Southend-on-Sea signing books with my stars and stripes bunting and tablecloth and I might even have some candy to share! Please come and see me if you live local and consider a signed novel (¬£8.99 so less than a tenner!) for a Christmas present! My mission is to outdo my afternoon in Liverpool and again SELL all my books but we have more! Come on Southend –prove you can do it! Help the local lass!

And of course if you can’t make it, I have signed copies for ¬£12 on my website if you are in the UK! It would cost more if shipping elsewhere!¬†http://www.debzhobbs-wyatt.co.uk/Pages/BuySignedCopies.aspx

The book is on Amazon too as you know! So please add it to your lists. And what a pertinent weekend to buy it, right?

Amazon.co.uk: LINK

Amazon.com: LINK

My Goodreads Giveaway finishes Sunday so if you haven’t had a go yet — please do! LINK

I was also in the local paper yesterday so as soon as I have a copy I will also post that here!

Have a lovely weekend.

I will leave you with my book trailer again for those who haven’t seen it, or want to see it again and my poster.

 

Have a peaceful one.

Signing again!

Signing again!

RIP JFK

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When the self-doubt creeps in…

I was asked how I dealt with doubt. How I dealt with writing something and then thinking it’s pants and wanting to abandon it. What should you do?

Great question from Daniel.

How do we deal with doubt?

Well, self-doubt is another part of process, trust me — and before we¬†start having regular acceptances and even when we¬†do, we all doubt in our ability. We might have friends, writing groups etc.saying this is great but nothing we¬†do finds the work the validation¬†we¬†seek and it’s tough. So there is doubt in a general sense and since rejection is part of process all you can do on that one is to keep writing and keep getting advice — and keep writing. Oh and keep writing. Work through the doubt much as you work through the pain of exercising on top of aches and pains from yesterday’s exercise! It does get easier as you shape up the muscle!

But how about when you are in a project, something like a novel that seems to be going well and then you think — this isn’t working. Start over?

It’s a hard one. I don’t tend to abandon short stories or novels, but I do leave them to rest if they really don’t feel as if they’re working, right now at this time. And often something happens that makes me go back and then usually the distance from it¬†¬†enables me to see what direction it wants to take. But there are a couple of older short stories¬†I probably won’t go back to. Sometimes you really do have to let go. But if that inner part of you says this is a great premise, worth fighting for, go back and you might be amazed what happens.

The trick is¬†being¬†discerning enough to know something won’t work and time to say bye-bye and knowing when it has that extra something that will get it noticed but either you are not ready to write it or it needs time to settle. And again I truly believe that writer’s instinct will develop the more you write and you will just know. I know I Am Wolf, my feral child novel, has something. I sense it. But I also knew it wasn’t holding together as it should, so when my agent told me what I knew, it proved my instincts were correct. I won’t abandon it, I will allow it to sit and I know when I do come back to it I will find a way to fix it.I just know it is a story that needs to be told. I just need a way to make the reader connect to Amy. She needs time in rehab and then I will go back to her.

Self-doubt has crept in recently with Isle of Pelicans as I still fear the plot isn’t quite there and has challenged me the whole way. So I want to get this draft down (that is always a good feeling) so I can rest it and work on something new now and then¬†come back to it. But I will come back to this one.

What helped me last week deal with doubt was writing a completely new short story that refueled by obsession with writing and it worked. If you haven’t written a short for a while you have this crazy notion you have forgotten how. I know it sounds insane. So now I feel better and the story has been subbed.

Allow stories time to rest and reexamine, but if in doubt write something new. And if it really isn’t working, know when to let go. Nothing is wasted because it’s all part of a long but rewarding process and patience is essential for a writer.

But don’t keep starting one thing and then abandoning it for another or you won’t finish anything. If you get to that stage, take a complete break and don’t write anything for a short time. I don’t tend to do that, but I do know there are times when the words come and the stories work and other times when they don’t. IT’S NORMAL!

Well as normal as life can be for those of us who live inside our own heads!

This is very apt.

Self doubt

Whatever you do — don’t give up!

HAPPY THURSDAY ALL!

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Be Consistent {Quick Copy Editing Notes 3}

We all know we need to be as consistent as possible in voice; if you’re using a teenage narrator ¬†for example don’t suddenly start using words in her thoughts and dialogue she’d never use, make sure you are consistent for character. But that’s not what I mean here and I include it as its own set of Copy Editing points as consistency in formatting and more commonly how we use words and phrases is one of the most common things I see when I copy edit.

The rule is: BE CONSISTENT. Be pedantic as you proof something for submission.

When words or combinations of words have different spellings, hyphenation or indeed capitalisation then you need to be aware of the form you use and use it throughout.

Common examples:

OK and okay are the correct forms, not ok, and do not use them interchangeably.

Ice cream or ice-cream: either is fine but again be consistent.

Recognise or recognize. The use of the z is more American English, but since how we use words is not defined by specific unbreakable rules but by common usage, it is now acceptable to use either form, but be consistent and don’t switch between the two. If you’re going to use recognize then you need to use realize, actualize etc. so the consistency will need to be throughout the piece.

Capitals: my mum is correct. My Mum is not: use a capital when used in place of a name.

Proper Names and Proper Nouns: it’s the teacher (small letter — common noun) but the teacher’s name clearly uses a capital (proper noun) Mrs Jones but you might use names like Teacher Jones and assign it a proper name status and therefore use capitals.

Job titles, types of animals, compass directions strictly speaking do not need capitals:

He was a vicar (small letter) but his name as above, Reverend Peters would need capitals for his title.

He photographed the lion (small letter in lion) but sometimes people opt for a capital as a stylistic choice but if you do, then ALL animals need to be afforded the same status.

We headed south. He lived to the west. He loved north Wales.

This is a more tricky one because you can say we headed to the West and use it as a proper name, but again be consistent. And I always think if the place name includes its direction like North Korea then use capitals for the complete place name (proper name). I like North Wales although my publisher said it should be north Wales in my bio!

Also think about how you use capitals in places: Paddington Station: proper name uses capitals, not Paddington station.

Names of bands, places etc. need capital letters, and brand names: He worked for Microsoft. He played guitar for Bon Jovi.

Also with brands you have to make sure you check how they spell it and stick to that so: iPhone not IPhone or Iphone.

Also when you use film, TV, book titles, album titles, newspapers etc use italics and make sure you not only spell but use capitals as they are used on the correct title: the Sunday Times, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, EastEnders.

Some phrases are often hyphenated: for example she was a fifteen-year-old girl is correct. But she was only fifteen years old does not need hyphens.

Numbers tend to use hyphens, I prefer that form: twenty-one, thirty-three etc. Again it’s more about consistency but compound numbers generally ought to have hyphens! Look at your chapter headings and in your text: which form do you use? BE CONSISTENT!

When I used to copy edit for a publisher on paper I had to identify as I read any word or phrase I thought might have an alternative usage so when I came across it again I could check consistency. Same with colour of character’s eyes etc: it was time consuming as you would be amazed how often we get these things wrong. We all do! I am pedantic about it now but they still creep in!

Now that publisher tends to send everything electronically it’s a lot easier, Find and Replace is a¬†valuable tool. I tend to be quite good at¬†noticing but I highlight words to check as a final read and I either leave that for the writer to adjust or change them all to the most commonly used form — so long as they are all the same form!

Be aware as you edit!

Find and Replace!

Find and Replace!

That’s all for today! Have a great one! Feel the buzz!

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When truth is elusive

Lots of thoughts buzzing this weekend as I made preparations for my talk at the Rochester Literary Festival in ten days’ time. When I wrote¬†While No One Was Watching I realised more than any other work, that truth is not something absolute and is defined by context. Yet we would tend to believe truth is a defined thing: a fact or belief ¬†about¬†something¬†known to have happened.¬†And the lie is considered a deliberate distortion of truth. But when truth is open to interpretation and is in fact really only in the mind of the believer, and a lie is only really a lie if a deliberate act, then is there such a thing as absolute truth?

When it comes to the Kennedy assassination, the quintessential conspiracy theory, truth is perhaps even more elusive. How do you know what ¬†to believe when you have credible books by experts, equally convincing, but saying the exact opposite thing. Is what we believe weighted by how many books we read that say lone assassin versus how many say conspiracy — is that a known entity defined by how many books are actually out there¬†and is that a figure biased by what people actually believe —¬†or is what we think just how many books we happened to read? #random? I mean you can’t read them all? My science brain is kicking in, having worked in research so I know how many credible sources you need to say something¬†might be probable and the errors through biased reading before you even examine the credibility of the source and author bias — I mean, even ‘factual’ books are little more than opinion a lot of the time, not absolute truth.

So I realise that there is truth in history, the known facts — Kennedy was assassinated at 12.30pm CST, on 22nd November 1963 in Dallas Texas as we rode in his motorcade, by gunshot wounds but even when I go to write from an assassin’s bullet I realise we are not moving away from absolute truth — how many assassins? The placement of the apostrophe suddenly becomes significant. So now we enter the realms of speculation and conjecture. Probability in fact!

I amassed huge amounts of information when I did my reading for While No One Was Watching. Huge. Far more than I needed, given the assassination is a catalyst for action and yes it is integral to plot but it is not an assassination novel per se. But the scientist in me has to have all the details. But truth remained elusive. The ‘factual’ books nothing more than conjecture. And while historical novelists receive critique from historians for their ‘bad version of history’; it’s a novel, by definition it’s ‘fantasy’ ; the author executing¬†‘creative license’ and since it means no one really knows which part is real and which is fantasy, I propose the novelist creates their own version of truth.

Stephen King claims that ‘Fiction is the truth inside the lie.’ I like that. I like that a lot. The novel is, in its purest form ‘made-up’. But, as in my novel and just about most novels you’ll read, it still needs some facets of reality to work. In my case, fact and fiction are woven together so tightly in places you can’t see the join! So the fiction writer is not so much the fantasist but the creator of a different type of truth. The truth of the story¬†and the role of the fiction writer is to make the reader believe.

A recent psychological study said that the way we read fiction and non-fiction is different. We tend to be far more critical about non-fiction. And if we are emotionally engaged and immersed in a story — we are far more likely to believe it. And indeed the writer of the novel has failed if their reader does not believe it, right? The rules are the rules the reader has created;¬†an un-truth¬†in reality, look at the alternative history novels like Mark Lawson’s Idelwild, Kennedy didn’t die that day¬†but the reader will believe that as the ‘truth’ inside the¬†lie — right? Of course they know here he did die. But what if the fictional elements are more subtle than that, a possibility the reader hadn’t considered before that changes his view about the historical truth?

Lydia Collins in my novel is psychic and even friends who confess to initially having reservations about a ‘psychic’ narrator, said by a page or so in they found her beguiling as a narrator and believed every word. So I did what I was supposed to, right? Phew. But what about my suggestions about what really happened that day at the grassy knoll?

So there lies the crux of the question I pose at my talk, this being the case, where the factual elements and the fictional ones are so close together, will my readers also believe, if even for a fleeting moment, that there really was a little girl called Eleanor Boone who disappeared from the grassy knoll and it had to be a plot to kill Kennedy or why else is she still missing?

The question therefore is: Do fiction writers affect what we believe about history?

What do you think? What films/books/plays etc. used real ¬†events and changed what you believed about the real event? (Even if it wasn’t actually true.) I would love to know … for my talk! Please email me or reply to this post! writer@debzhobbs-wyatt.co.uk

Have a great day everyone.

Don't forget to book your tickets! October 1st in Kent!

Don’t forget to book your tickets! October 1st in Kent! BOOK¬†

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