Writing Prompts

We had a great meeting last night at Canvey Writers.

I set out with three different types of writing prompt: one envelope called Plotting, one called Sculpting and one called Subtext. The idea was no one knew which was the more fiction one, which was more memoir and which was screenplay and they then all had twenty minutes to work. The ones who chose the Subtext one, of which I needed four, had to go elsewhere to work as a team.

It was really interesting to see how people got on and what we learned about each of them as a writer through the work they produced.

I will share some of this with you later in the week, but first, let’s look at what each prompt was and perhaps some of you might like to play along at home!

  1. Plotting: each person who chose this had three questions on a piece of paper. Here are some examples:
  1. Who just snuck in through the window?
  2. What were they carrying?
  3. Where were they going?

 

  1. Who is Ethan?
  2. Why is he crying?
  3. What is he going to do about it?

 

  1. Whose house is Julia leaving?
  2. Why was she there?
  3. Where is she going now?

 

  1. What is Alfie’s big idea?
  2. Who does he share it with?
  3. What is their plan of action?

 

  1. Why is the dog barking?
  2. Whose dog is it?
  3. What happened to the owner?

 

  1. What big secret did Maisie overhear?
  2. Who will she tell first?
  3. What will happen next?

 

2. Sculpting:

In any order, time-wise write out five life-defining moments.

 

3. Subtext:

In a group of 4 we will explore ‘subtext’ in a scene through action and reaction.

 

Person one: Employee

Person two: Boss

Scenario: Employee is asking the Boss for a pay rise.

Person three: the thoughts of Person one.

Person four: the thoughts of Person two.

Create the scene, location, time of day, brief visual on the two characters speaking.

Write their dialogue (actions as direction based on how you would act out the dialogue: hands to face, looking down etc.)

Person three and four must narrate the internal dialogue after what is said.

Create a scene that time permitting can be acted out!

So how did they get on… find out later this week!

The Canvey Writers hard at work…

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